Diagnosis Destinations  Apraxia  Possible Oral Apraxia or Oral Motor Warning Signs

There are two types of oral motor problems.

Oral Apraxia is a disorder where the child, who typically is a "late talker" is unable to coordinate and/or initiate movement of their jaw, lips and tongue (articulators) on command.

An Oral Motor Disorder, which could be a different oral motor problem than apraxia (could be from weakness for example) is the second type, in which the child is unable to coordinate and/or initiate movement of normal eating movements (vegetative activities.)

The following are some possible warning signs of the two types of oral motor apraxia, written by Lisa Geng, the parent of two children who were diagnosed by a neurologist (Dr. DeSouza) with two different types of oral apraxia with the assistance of Cherab advisor, Sara R. Johnson, CCC/SLP.

Can your child do the following regularly or on command:

If your child cannot do all or some of the above, this may be a sign of Oral Apraxia, which is worth looking into with medical and speech professionals.

Or does your child...

If your child does all or some of the above, this may be a sign of Oral Motor problems, which is worth exploring with medical and speech professionals.

If you are seeing any of the above signs, seek out the services of a Speech Language Therapist for an evaluation of these skills. This can be done through your State's Early Intervention Programs, a free federally funded program for qualified children from birth to three years of age or through your school district's preschool disabled program, a free program for qualified children between the ages of three to 6 years. You can also contact the American Speech Language-Hearing Association in Rockville, Maryland for a list of certified clinicians in your area. It is very important to have an ACCURATE assessment completed by a skilled clinician. You may also want an evaluation from a developmental pediatrician, or pediatric neurologist to look for signs of low tone (hypotonia).

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